First Reviews of American Resistance

The first reviews of the book came out over the holiday weekend.  In Joseph O’Neill’s “No More Nice Dems,” he discusses American Resistance along with Meaghan Winter’s All Politics is Local in the holiday issue of New York Review of Books.  Noah Berlatsky writes “Trump’s lies and cruelty fueled a real resistance. That’s hopeful news for progressivism” for a piece on NBC Think.  More reviews are in progress–I’ll share when they are available.

In the meantime, protesters once again shut down Washington, DC today, as the climate resistance gets more confrontational.

American Resistance’s First Week

It’s been a busy first week filled with numerous events in New York City and Washington, DC.  I also did an interview with Jesse Singal for ArcDigital (many thanks to them for the cool image I’m sporting above and on twitter!), the Breakthrough barriers with Damali podcast, and the @NewBooksPoliSci podcast with Heath Brown.

I’m currently on my way back up to NYC for events at the Astoria Bookstore  with Vanessa Wruble from March On TONIGHT, and at Civic Hall with Joan Walsh and Micah Sifry TOMORROW, so come if you can!

If you’re in DC, I’ll be at Politics and Prose with James Zogby next weekend (the 23rd).  For a full list of events (including new ones added in VA and Boulder and more coming soon in Iowa), see here.

American Resistance Builds Momentum

American Resistance is officially out on Tuesday (that’s election day in a number of states)!  Events to promote the book began in New York City this week with a publisher’s salon and a chat about the book on Morning Joe on November 1st.

Discussing American Resistance on Morning Joe

Stay tuned for much more.  Also, if you’re in the mid-Atlantic region, check out the list of the many book events scheduled in New York, Washington, DC and Philadelphia in the next 5 weeks (including a joint event with Leah Greenberg and Ezra Levin from Indivisible to discuss our new books at Swarthmore College on December 2nd)!  I’m still scheduling more events in many more places–the full list of confirmed public events is available here.  If you don’t see an event where you live, contact me and we can try to get something scheduled!

 

The Power of Social Movements and Civic Activism

I’m just back from a series of talks that included meeting with civic leaders from the Western Hemisphere to discuss civic activism and its role within the democratic process.   I presented my recent work on the youth climate movement and how it connects with the Resistance.  One of the participants in the group–Raul Olivan Cortes–from the Government of Aragón in Spain created this diagram of my talk.  Many of the main themes of American Resistance are right there (along with a beautiful portrait of me and a representation of the cover of the book).  Thanks to Raul for allowing me to share his image!

StateParticipantImage

Looking Back at a Week of Climate Resistance

Early estimations report that over 7 million people participated in what Greta Thunberg and others are calling the #WeekforFuture, which included Climate Strikes and direct action around the world.  Here in the US, I worked with the organizers of the Strike to survey the hosts of 633 of the events as well as collecting data in the crowd in Washington, DC on September 20th.

As I wrote in a piece in July 2019 based on earlier data, the youth climate movement in the US is populated by young people who cut their teeth in the American Resistance.  Over half of participants in the DC Climate Strike (58%) had participated in the March for Our Lives and almost half (46%) had participated in the first Women’s March in 2017.

This weekend, I published a new piece that highlights how the young people who are participated in this growing climate movement are extremely civically engaged. “Three-quarters, or 76 percent, of the participants will be eligible to vote in the U.S. 2020 election. And their current levels of civic engagement strongly suggests they will vote.”

 

American Resistance Is Arriving

While preorders of advanced copies are being delivered, I’m still working on scheduling events around the US to discuss American Resistance.  Check out the current schedule of events for the next few months.  If you’re in New York, Princeton, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Atlanta, Denver, Boulder, or Toronto, definitely come out!  I’m still booking events so reach out if you’re interested in a place where I haven’t yet scheduled anything.

As many people already know, there’s been a terrific amount of climate resistance taking place–with the Global Climate Strike on Friday and today’s #ShutDownDC.  Much more is planned for the rest of Climate Week.  Stay tuned as I’ll have more to say (and findings to share) soon.

Watching Youth Climate Resistance Spread

Late last week, Greta Thunberg arrived in the US to participate in the events around Climate Week that will coincide with climate-related meetings at the United Nations on 23-29 September. Before the festivities get underway, a whole week of climate resistance is scheduled, including the #GlobalClimateStrike on 20th September.  The Strike is expected to draw both adult and student participants around the world.

Two days after her arrival, Thunberg and her many compatriots held a school strike at the UN on Friday–for the first time striking together in the same place (although many people participated in school strikes around the US and the world on Friday as well!).   As many readers know, I have been studying the climate movement and how it is related to the Resistance since 2016 (see chapter 5 in this volume for an early account).

After writing this recent piece about the broader importance of the growing school strikes –which organizers like Thunberg call “Fridays for Future”–I started studying the participants in the youth climate movement in the US and abroad.  I found that many of the young people participating in the US had cut their teeth in the Resistance, participating in Women’s Marches or activism around gun violence, including the National School Strike and March for Our Lives in 2018.

The project also looks at how all the young people participating are connected through organizations, which I call “the connective tissue of democracy” (American Resistance, page 63).  Here is a network diagram of the affiliation of participants in the youth climate movement in the US showing how individuals are connected with organizations (green nodes) and specific hashtags (pink nodes).  Although Fridays for Future and Sunrise have gotten a lot of attention in recent months, this diagram provides a broader sense of the organizational landscape and the ways that individuals are connected to specific organizations and one another.

NetworkDiagram_UStake2

The Calm Before the Storm

Last week, I presented sections of the American Resistance and work related to the project at the annual sociology meetings. Here’s a photo from a video of me talking about posting papers related to the book. SocArxivYouTube

I’m enjoying a bit of calm before American Resistance officially comes out on November 5th (remember that you can preorder now for a discount).  Already, numerous events have been scheduled around the book and more are in the works–if you’re interested in booking an event, contact me.  I will be updating the list of appearances here.

We are also experiencing the August calm before Resistance in the streets gets going again this fall.  Already, the Global Climate Strike is scheduled for September (with the big events taking place on the 20th in the US), the TransMarch on DC on September 28th, and certainly more to come!

Word Mapping American Resistance

While reviewing the index for American Resistance, I realized that it provides some interesting data for thinking about the Resistance (and the contents of the book).  Here is a word cloud made up of the most common words/phrases in the index.  The size of the word or phrase is based on how many times it is mentioned in the index.  I removed the word “surveys” from the map because it was the most mentioned by far–since most of the data I collected for the book are survey data.

IndexWordCloud